Unique Local IPv6 Generator

Hi, I'm tweedge.

While troubleshooting NPTv6 on my router, I stumbled across a dead link to unique-local-ipv6.com. Checking the Wayback Machine, the site was preserved and functional, so I decided to restore it for others' convenience. As of today, there are ~100 dead links currently visible to Google pointed to it - including everything from GitHub issues, to the thread I was using to troubleshoot, to even slides presented at the Linux Foundation.

This page describes the history of the site, what I've done to restore it, and some minor errata. I wrote about how restoring this site changed how I'm approaching my own projects on my blog - I encourage you to give it a read if you're interested in how you can help your digital works outlive yourself.

Cheers :)

Timeline

A nearly complete history of this site is visible through the Wayback Machine archives:

Restoration Process

So, what did I change or add since the original site?

  1. Bought the original domain, as it was available to register again
  2. Pulled the original saved files for the index.html and faq.html pages from the Wayback Machine (here's an example of pulling only the original HTML from the Wayback Machine)
  3. Removed comments from those HTML files inserted by the Wayback Machine
  4. Fixed indentation and somewhat standardized formatting for the HTML files
  5. Removed Google Analytics from the site
  6. Fetched the sites' required dependencies and bundled them into a subdirectory (bootstrap@3.0.3, and jquery@1.10.2) - this isn't necessary, just personal preference
  7. Versioned the site in GitHub at tweedge/unique-local-ipv6 so any feedback can be left easily, and future updates (not planning much) are trivial
  8. Updating the FAQ and Index, fixing some minor spelling errors and ensuring content is accurate
  9. Set up Edge Storage and CDN services with bunny.net so the new copy of the site is available globally in a snap
  10. Added a brief GitHub Action to update the site's edge storage bucket automatically when the source changes
  11. Wrote this new about.html page describing the history of the site and what little was necessary to restore it

The process described above would work for anyone looking to restore a similarly clientside-only website from its early grave. However, please note that this is not solving any problems with site preservation - having a copy of this site nearly five years after it vanished off the internet is only possible because of the Internet Archive. Please donate if you are able and willing - we're trashing our digital history every day, and there are very few organizations solving such fundamental problems.

Post-Spammer-Owned Domains

The original domain was available as the spammer (see Timeline) had let it lapse, so I purchased that to make the old links that I'd tried following useful again. This came with a minor issue - the domain had been flagged by Google as "pure spam" in violation of Google's Webmaster Guidelines, which lowers or removes it from Google's results. That's probably part of why the spammer let the domain registration lapse - no more clicks for them once Google figured out the ruse.

I found this out when I loaded the domain into Google Search Console - the violation (and some other errata, like sitemaps and metadata about indexed pages) carries over to the new owner, and I had to file for it to be reviewed by Google's staff. After some back-and-forth with Google's support, I did get this violation removed.

Privacy

Requests to this site are logged by BunnyCDN for abuse detection/prevention, though the last few digits of IP addresses are not viewable by me for a very slight gain in anonymity. All ULAs are generated clientside and are not logged by this site.

I commit that as long as this site is operated by me, it will never perform clientside tracking of viewers, and will never serve advertisements.

As noted in the footer, I (tweedge) am not the original author of this site. Unfortunately, since the original copyright was nebulous ("Copyright 2013 unique-local-ipv6.com") it's not clear who produced or owned the source code for this site. Based on historical WHOIS records, this may have been Manuel Badzong or another affiliate of ANDEV GMBH, as both those entities showed up in WHOIS records for this site at the time of its initial registration.

I am assuming "no news is good news," but if the original rightsholder contacts me with any objection (and proof of their authorship/ownership), I am certainly happy to address their concerns.

Unfortunately I am also not sure how copying/redsitributing this should work for anyone looking to make a derivative of this site, and cannot advise you in this matter. To avoid concerns like this in my own work, I am dedicating substantially more of my written works to the Creative Commons and encourage others to do the same if their values are aligned with that (I discuss this more on my blog for any interested).